Holiday hiring slump: how to network & be productive when business is slow

Holiday hiring slump: how to network & be productive when business is slow

December is notorious not only for its icy freezes, but for hiring freezes, too. (Unless you work in retail. In which case, I admire you for your strength.)

And that can be a pain for those of us looking for work. (Though what job-seeker wouldn’t be a bit panicky at the thought of starting a new gig at the height of the holiday season?) If you’re on the market for new employment but aren’t getting a lot of leads, you can still use the holiday season to get ahead on your networking game.

Here are nine ways to polish your online presence, make new connections and maybe even open up doors that will lead to employment. (You know, for when you’re not last-minute Christmas shopping or sipping seasonal cocktails):

Update your bio or about page. So you have a website that you update regularly. But when was the last time you even looked at your bio page? Is it collecting dust? Does it still say you’re overseas teaching English to penguins who are probably dead by now? (First thing that popped into my mind.) Don’t let your first impression give the wrong impression—refresh that bio, and update your headshot while you’re at it.

Revise your resume and organize your clips/samples. If you’re been using the same resume template for years, it’s time for a revision. Have you picked up any new skills or taken on new clients? Can you tighten up the language or remove a position that’s not really relevant anymore? Make those changes. And if your work constitutes having a portfolio or providing work samples, collect links or files and organize them neatly on your computer and website. This is your go-to when potential employers ask for examples of your work.

Breathe new life into a standby cover letter. They say you’re not supposed to have a “Dear X, I’d love to be considered for the X position with X” cover letter, and they would be correct. (It’s so obvious when you just copy and paste positions and company names into a generic cover letter.) But most of us aren’t rewriting each letter from scratch, either. Sit down and write out all the things that make you a great catch and then use that to draft a letter that’s inspired. If you’re stuck, this post outlines a great mind trick for writing a non-sucky cover letter.

Clean up your social media accounts. Unfollow people who annoy you or don’t follow you back, create Twitter lists of your favorites, and read through your latest posts to make sure they’re contributing to an image you want to convey. Do away with any social media sites that zap your energy or merely feel like an obligation. As Sarah Von Bargen says, you only need to be active on two or three sites that you enjoy using and that make sense for you.

Talk to people you’d like to work with online. On the subject of social media—are you following or talking to the people you’d like to work with (or for) online? Find the writers, editors, designers, marketers, public speakers or developers who are your colleagues—or who you want to be—and respond to their posts, share their content and offer up your own thoughts on the same subjects. Don’t kiss ass just to kiss ass. Engage and discuss. People will start to take notice, and you’ll attract followers in your field.

Offer pro bono work. ‘Tis the season of giving. Offer your services free of charge to a nonprofit or organization you’d like to work for or whose cause is important to you. This is especially valuable if you don’t have a lot of experience. Sometimes one solid recommendation is all you need to get your foot in the door for the next paid gig that comes along, and if you do a solid job, you’ll get just that.

Write testimonials for connections on LinkedIn. Endorse or write glowing reviews for current or former colleagues whose work you’re familiar with. It’s not only good karma, but those people will be more likely to think of you when they hear of a job that pops up. (And maybe they’ll return the testimonial-writing favor!)

Send holiday cards or “thinking of you” emails. This is not one of those emails that says “It’s been so long” and “I have a favor to ask” in the same damn paragraph. Instead, try a no-ulterior-motive email like this: “Hey X – Merry Christmas! Hope all is well. I thought of you recently when X. I just caught up with your latest project – impressive stuff!” Warm fuzzies all around.

Keep an eye out—just in case. Hey, new opportunities can come up any time. (There are a lot of good reasons why December can actually be a great time to land a gig if you’re looking.) Just ask Laura or Nicole—they both just started great new jobs they’re excited about! So have your stuff together and be ready for when that opportunity arrives. In the meantime, enjoy the holidays!

Aside from some of the above, I’m working on a brand new site design that I’m really excited about and hope to reveal for the new year. It’s a much-needed refresher that I’ll be even more proud to show off to potential employers.

Are you currently on the job hunt?

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Comments

  1. This is so helpful! I’m not actively looking for a new job (although I’m always taking a peek to see what’s out there). I’ve just started a project at work that is excellent experience- and responsibility-wise. Though I’m not convinced that I’m supposed to stay at this company for the long haul (despite the low turnover we have – seriously the average tenure is 15-20 years. One guy has been here for 40!). I will say, having an up to date and detailed linked in profile is quite helpful. Maybe it’s just my industry, but I get calls/emails from headhunters at least once a week.

    Also, shoutout to Nicole, I know her!!!

    • Cassie Paton says:

      I think it’s smart to keep an eye on the job market even if you don’t plan on leaving your job. It’s good to have a sense of what your industry is going through. Sounds like you’re in a good spot!

  2. This is great! I have been job hunting, foreevverr. I don’t mind pro bono work aka volunteering to boost my resume but the hard part is trying to pay the bills and rent. I will definitely try all of this to boost myself! Thanks

    • Cassie Paton says:

      I’m right there with ya – volunteering isn’t always an option when there are bills to pay, but if you can afford to do it, it certainly is a great thing to do. Good luck in your continued job hunt!

  3. These are all great tips! Thankfully I’m employed but losing sight of what I need to do. I feel stagnant and I’m exhausted. Hoping to get some direction and answers in 2015. Best of luck finding employment and enjoy your holidays without worrying about taking leave! Have a great one Cassie! -Iva

  4. These are great! I was just thinking about how I bet NO ONE is hiring around the holidays because it’s already mad chaos. I will definitely be applying all of these to my life this season.

    • Cassie Paton says:

      Yeah, I sent out a couple resumes right before Christmas wondering, “Will anyone read this?” But I still managed to be very productive in other ways. Hope these were helpful!

  5. This is super helpful as I job hunt and try to expand my freelance clientele. Thank you!

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